Netflix uses cookies for personalization, to customize its online advertisements, and for other purposes. Well duh, Ty, your comment should be a disclaimer for the show, “You think you are CHOOSING to go on vacation, but the UNIVERSE has already DETERMINED it” lmao. With Hany Farid. By using our Services or clicking I agree, you agree to our use of cookies. As a fan of Radio Lab, I am familiar with Latif Nasser and I was enjoying the first few episodes of Connected until the 'Digits' episode. The constant monologues only accentuate any issues some people may have with the tone and it’s certainly not helped by some exaggerated facial expressions in the field. , or was it a result of the Netflix model allowing smaller teams to work on production (A great thing no doubt) , resulting in a team without a member with high-enough math-knowledge ? I was thinking the same thing as I watched this. Latif explores the sometimes cute, often creepy ways surveillance pervades our lives. ... Digits 46m. Sorry I'm still ignorant about this but you seem like you know what you're talking about...I understand the fact that there there should be more 1s because that's what 1s, 10s, 100s begin with. Well, you may be right. (these scientists were too polite to say : "relax, it is not that weird" ?) Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment. Netflix supports the Digital Advertising Alliance Principles. Digits But excrement is more complex than we think, holding many secrets, many problems and, potentially, many solutions. Problem. Add the first question. JOIN NOW SIGN IN. With a consistent motif of connections, the topics range from nukes, surveillance and even excrement in a bid to explore how we’re connected together and the universe as a whole. "Everything is connected" is an old cliché. Your show was pretty entertaining for a few episodes, but this episode was just straight up disingenuous and now I really kind of question everything you shared in earlier episodes. The answer involves a shipwreck and a shark-proof garden hose. You can change (your cookie preferences); by clicking accept, you accept all cookies. Latif explores a law of numerical probability that applies to classic music, contemporary social media, tax fraud and perhaps the entire universe. Dumbing down content or using an overgrown teenager to “ wooow” his way through episodes is most likely just frustrating for your audience instead of attracting a new group. A young woman (Molly Nutley) from a small town has big aspirations as a dancer and disguises herself as a man to perform in a struggling drag club. Connected. But the show decides to dedicate 5 minutes of time to that anyway. No ragrets--not even that vowel.". First half is very interesting concerning Benford's Law and how it is encountered in daily life, and certain groups use it as a screening tool for detecting fraud.Second half devolves into politics and 'protecting the democracy' with Benford's Law from 'Russian meddling' via social media monitoring and such.Seems like it's just an itch that Netflix can't help but scratch.... Devolving all shows into politics or 'reteaching' no matter how subtle it may be. 1 Summary 2 Crew 3 Episodes 4 Awards 5 Gallery 5.1 Promotional Videos 5.2 Promotional Images 6 See More 7 References Latif Nasser Season … An aspiring young country singer finds the band she's been missing when she takes a job as a nanny for a musically talented family. If you take 1 to 99 and represent every number in a data set you will have equal probability in all numbers. On a call from Los Angeles, ... titled ‘Digits’. That is not true. Pic credit: Netflix. You are peddling in nontruth and people are stupider for having watched your show. Trying to find patterns in random data and thinking the universe is communicating with them. Science journalist Latif Nasser investigates the surprising and intricate ways in which we are connected to each other, the world and the universe. But excrement is more complex than we think, holding many secrets, many problems and, potentially, many solutions. However, just doing a little more (and I mean a little) about it, it seems to be a little more complex and deserving of real intrigue than I (and maybe you) are giving it credit. The site may not work properly if you don't, If you do not update your browser, we suggest you visit, Press J to jump to the feed. Another argument could be that if we used the binary system instead of the decimal, then 100% of the numbers would start with a 1. With Latif Nasser, Christopher Heckscher, Emma Baxter, Mel Smith. The narration is the weakest part of the whole show but if you can take to that, then there’s a lot to like with this one. There is no way you flew around the world talking to data scientists and didn't have any one of them explain that this happens because of the way we order our numbers. If you rolled a 20 sided die a thousand times you'd get 50% of numbers that start with a 1. To me, this is quite interesting. Learn more about our use of cookies and information. Do we really need to know the route of the Queen’s faeces? This FAQ is empty. Looks like you're using new Reddit on an old browser. Netflix and third parties use cookies and similar technologies on this website to collect information about your browsing activities which we use to analyse your use of the website, to personalise our services and to customise our online advertisements. Benford's law is not an example of the universe breaking from randomness. Explore the unexpected links of our existence. Science journalist Latif Nasser investigates the surprising and intricate ways in which we are connected to each other, the world and the universe. I am still waiting for the time when documentary producers finally will understand their audience. Dust Anything other than than a data set which ends in all 9's will represent as more ones than nines and some sort of curve in between. You don't need an advanced degree in math to understand it. Do you have anyone that works for your show that understands math at a high school level? Given the sheer number of documentary series on Netflix right now, Connected is a series you’ll either instantly connect to or instantly turn away from. No explanation of Benford’s law was presented, instead it got left to look like a conspiracy theory or some kind of cosmic magic. It’s also one of those network TV shows (the better ones) that feel like you could dip in and out of this while doing other things. Am I surprised by the general trend of the benford curve - is that lower numbers are more common? Science journalist Latif Nasser investigates the surprising and intricate ways in which we are connected to each other, the world and the universe. Is this not random? © 2020 TheReviewGeek. When an ancient troll is awakened in a Norwegian mountain, a rag-tag group of heroes must come together to try and stop it from wreaking deadly havoc. Watch trailers & learn more. But nuclear bombs also taught us things about ourselves and our world that we couldn’t have learned any other way. Title: A speck of dust seems insignificant, but a swarm of it can do everything from generating oxygen to tempering hurricanes to fertilizing the rainforest. Connected - a new Netflix series - specifically Season 1 episode 4 - "Digits" Talks about how there is no such thing as randomness due to Bensford Law! I do think it is super interesting to use it as a way to find fraud, but agreed that it seemed to not be surprising that many things in the world would follow such a distribution similar to how ubiquitous the normal curve is. Latif explores a law of numerical probability that applies to classical music, contemporary social media, tax fraud and perhaps the entire universe. (that is, if you start counting from the lower up... from 1 to 20 for example, there are 11 1's in the digits, 3 2's, 2 3's, etc... and if the number at which you stop is random and you recreate the count, these proportions will emerge and they can be calculated and proven quite easily). This consequently means people will either instantly warm to or instantly turn away from this series. You must be a registered user to use the IMDb rating plugin. A speck of dust seems insignificant, but a swarm of it can do everything from generating oxygen to tempering hurricanes to fertilizing the rainforest. ... Digits 46m. Well, you may be right. In this upbeat English-language special, comedian Ari Eldjárn pokes fun at Nordic rivalries, Hollywood's take on Thor, the whims of toddlers and more. Digits episode was pretty disappointing. Netflix’s new docuseries Connected chronicles these and many more connections between seemingly disassociated objects all around us. Thank you for articulating exactly what I was thinking. Based on true events. "Everything is connected" is an old cliché. 2020 TV-14 1 Season Docuseries. Bendford's Law doesn't say anything about nature or reality, other than that in a set of things, the smaller ones are more common than the bigger ones. The official subreddit for the Netflix docuseries “Connected: The Hidden Science of Everything”. Interesting, informative and quirky, Connected is a documentary series on Netflix that’s very easy to dip in and out of. I was looking for a discussion to say something similar. Personally though, the humour and overall tone falls on the side of trying a little too hard to keep your attention. The basic premise of Connected is certainly intriguing and features a great hook. View production, box office, & company info, Connected: The Hidden Science of Everything. Latif explores the sometimes cute, often creepy ways surveillance pervades our lives. More posts from the ConnectedNetflix community. But then again, I literally mostly nothing about math and statistics so I may be completely wrong. It’s also an incredibly polarizing watch, with an eccentric and oftentimes dumbfounded narrator. That aforementioned wonder may be just the ticket to engage and reach out to a younger audience or those sharing that same fascination. Because that is how the decimal system works.. there are 1s more than 2s and so on. Emicida: AmarElo - It’s All For Yesterday. Martin Scorsese directs this Netflix original comedy special exploring the enduring legacy of Emmy-winning sketch comedy show "SCTV.". "Everything is connected" is an old cliché. There’s a lot of discussion points here that take on a new perspective and it helps that the series tries its best to steer away from a doom-and-gloom tone. It’s also an incredibly polarizing watch, with an eccentric and oftentimes dumbfounded narrator. Feels like they are trying to keep the “hidden science of everything” hidden. Probably not. The best episode by far is “Digits” as he breaks down a Math and Science subject known as Benford’s Law. Any real science reporter should be ashamed of producing such garbage. Nasser's take on Benford's Law unnecessarily mystified the topic in a manner much like that of peddlers of pseudo-science. The episode was so egregious that I can't bring myself to watch any more of the series. With only six episodes to prove this audacious statement, the … But nuclear bombs also taught us things about ourselves and our world that we couldn’t have learned any other way. Having to google it isn’t the end of the world, but I don’t think I’ll bother to keep watching since explaining stuff stuff doesn’t seem like a priority of this show. UNLIMITED TV SHOWS & MOVIES. Was it cultural? Digits 4 is DIGITS and is all about Benford’s Law and the variety of natural (and unnatural lol like politics) things that all follow the same rule. Latif explores a law of numerical probability that applies to classical music, contemporary social media, tax fraud and perhaps the entire universe. But what if it's really true? Latif Nasser and Stefan Wolff from the series Connected. Netflix and third parties use cookies (why?).