But when all is said and done, the Serb will probably go down as the greatest player in the history of the game. How Does Novak Djokovic’s Backhand Apply to Your Game? When it comes to his forehand, Novak Djokovic’s semi-western grip allows him to execute the four basic shots very well - the drives, the topspin shots, the angling shots, and the volleys. One drawback to Rafa's heavy topspins has been their tendency to fall short, so he has also learned how to flatten his forehands out a bit and thereby get more pace and depth. Once Djokovic recognizes the incoming ball, he begins holding the racket with a continental right hand grip and an eastern left-handed forehand grip. Not only is his racquet-swing very compact now, but it also packs a greater punch. Once Djokovic has reached the top of his swing or what I call the “set position,” he then proceeds to drop the racket below the level of the incoming ball so that the butt cap of the racket faces the ball. Some club players at this point tend to bail out of the shot by leaning back or failing to complete the follow through with the racket finishing past the right shoulder. Today, we’ll be breaking down Djokovic’s backhand according to the below 5 phases of the swing: Like any good stroke in tennis, Djokovic’s backhand begins with a unit turn. Also notice, Djokovic’s racket is coming from a low to high angle, helping to generate topspin as well as ample pace. Juan Martin Del Potro uses a Semi-Western grip to hit one of the most powerful forehands ever seen in tennis, and he typically gets outstanding depth as well. Not surprisingly, Djokovic uses the same technical elements shared by other world class two handed players on tour. Fernando Gonzales hits one of the hardest forehands ever in tennis. Racket tip facing upwards. When Agassi would hit later and higher, he would sometimes shift his grip toward the Semi-Western. Once Djokovic recognizes the incoming ball, he begins holding the racket with a continental right hand grip and an eastern left-handed forehand grip. Novak Djokovic's forehand grip is roughly 2/3 Western, a little closer to Semi-Western than Western. Chin touching right shoulder. Djokovic doesn’t use a full loop (like Sharapova and Azarenka), but instead, Djokovic opts for a mini-loop with the racket tip forming a slight “C.”. Roger Federer uses a forehand grip halfway between Eastern and Semi-Western that suits his preference for hitting less topspin than most of his more Western competitors. Join the Stevegtennis.com tennis club for free. Djokovic’s forehand, meanwhile, hasn’t been as widely celebrated; some even claimed it to be one of his less impactful shots at the start of his career. ©2020 STEVEGTENNIS.COM - All 3rd party trademarks are hereby acknowledged. This is the definition of a world class swing, because most players only take half of a backswing and then try to arm the ball once they swing forward. Prakash Amritraj further believes that Novak Djokovic has shown remarkable improvement in another department - his mental strength. He uses a Semi-Western grip to hit an exceptionally accurate forehand with more pace than one might expect from a player his size. Djokovic’s contact point is usually slightly in front. Djokovic’s Fluid Backswing with the Racket Head Up in The Preparation is Key, If you watch Djokovic, the lowering of the racket/wrist below the level of the ball seems seamless, and this is directly result of a more smooth “loop style” swing path. This is indicative of a full shoulder turn, and a key behind every world class two handed backhand. This article was written by Coach Ed of Optimum Tennis. Djokovic Completes the Follow through – The Rotation Allows the Torso to Come Through. A Complete Swing. Murray was simply in amazing form, and I was pleasantly surprised to see the underdog take home the US Open title. disqualification from the ongoing US Open. Read about other analysis here: Sampras uses an Eastern forehand grip to hit quite hard and deep, with strong but not exceptionally heavy topspin. As you might know by now, the best players in the world hit their shots as well as they do because they possess virtually flawless technique. Novak Djokovic's forehand grip is roughly 2/3 Western, a little closer to Semi-Western than Western. Djokovic hits with excellent pace, and on his better days, his depth is so consistent, he gives opponents very few chances to attack. Nadal can whip his racquet up the back of the ball to hit one of the heaviest topspin forehands on the ATP Tour, often kicking the ball high enough to force his opponent into a weak reply. This “unit turn” coils the body, so that Djokovic’s chin is touching his right shoulder at the height of his preparation. He further stressed on the improvement in the Serb’s mental toughness, which for him is the best in business. Typically, Djokovic uses a split step timed to the opponent’s contact point, and immediately begins turning sideways, making sure that the hips turn around 45 degrees, which initiates the lower body and torso to begin the sideways movement.