©Copyright 2001-2020. [103] The club adopted the motto: We Fear No Foe Where E'er We Go. The game, won 2–0 by Hull, was overshadowed when seats, coins and plastic bottles were thrown by some away supporters. It was described by the BBC as one of the worst cases of civil disorder seen in Britain in recent times. Millwall played local rivals West Ham United away at Upton Park on 17 September 1906 in a Western Leaguegame. Scotland Yard withdrew its threat to sue, stating: "In light of the efforts made and a donation to a charity helping injured police officers, the Metropolitan Police Service has decided not to pursue legal action against Millwall F.C. [17] In the 1927–28 season Millwall won the Third Division South title and scored 87 goals at home in the league, an English record which still stands. [35] When Millwall's unbeaten home record of 59 games came to an end against Plymouth Argyle in 1967, the windows of the away team's coach were smashed. The match is remembered for all the wrong reasons, after hooligans rioted at the game. [32], George Graham managed Millwall from 1983 to 1986, and during that time he guided the club to a Football League Group Cup win, beating Lincoln City 3–2 in the final in the 1982–83 season. in relation to the disorder". [12] In 1982 Millwall club chairman Alan Thorne threatened to close the club because of violence sparked by losing in the FA Cup to non-league side Slough Town. [120] The game was also blighted by allegations of racist chanting. records and statistics, "The Den Millwall FC – Football Ground Guide", "Millwall, The Den and the misfortunes of war", "20 January 1974: The first Sunday football", "England League Cup Full Results 1960–1996", "Curtis Weston: History man or just a footballing footnote", "John G Berylson proud to lead the revival of Millwall", "League Managers Association: Kenny Jackett profile", "Blackburn Rovers 0–1 Millwall | FA Cup sixth-round replay match report | Football", "Kenny Jackett: Millwall manager resigns", "Poll: What do you make of Steve Lomas' arrival at Millwall? [12] When Millwall's unbeaten home record of 59 games came to an end against Plymouth Argyle in 1967, the windows of the away team's coach were smashed. This escalated into violent clashes between fans of the two teams. The fans that watched those games are some of the most feared soccer hooligan gangs by virtue of having a literal war named after them. In August 1993, Millwall relocated to the New Den and ended that season third in Division One, entering the playoffs to try and win a place in the FA Premier League. From 1886 to 1890 they played behind The Lord Nelson pub on East Ferry Road, which was known as the Lord Nelson Ground, before being forced to leave by the landlady, who received a better offer for its use.[9]. [131] It continued into the 2008–09 season; where the teams were vying for promotion to the Championship, culminating in Millwall knocking Leeds out of the League One playoffs at the semi-final stage.