Definition of Dog king in the Definitions.net dictionary. i leave now. Ongendus was a king of the Danes, reigning c. 710, the first Danish king known from contemporary literature. Dog: ...Execute him. Randver, sometimes assigned to the early 700s. [1] His name would in his own language (Proto-Norse) have been *Hailaga [2] (dedicated to the gods).Scholars generally agree that he appears in both Anglo-Saxon and Scandinavian tradition (Norse sagas and Danish chronicles). level 2. After several years together, Floki proposed marriage after he learned that Helga was carrying his child. Hrothgar also Hroðgar (Proto-Norse *Hrōþigaizaz , Hrothgar, Hróar, Ro, Roar), was a legendary Danish king, who appears not only in the Anglo-Saxon epic Beowulf, but also in a number of Scandinavian sources, such as the Gesta Danorum, the Chronicon Lethrense, the Latin summary of the lost Skjöldunga saga and Hrólf Kraki's saga. Meaning of Dog king. Halga, Helgi, Helghe or Helgo was a legendary Danish king living in the early 6th century[1]. I forgot the name of the book, but it definitely says 6 century, search king halga. Son of Valdar (or Radbard) according to late sagas; fell in England. Jester: A dog as a king? is crazy. Guard: Very good, sir. At the end of Season Four, she was unfortunately killed by Tanaruz. ok bye bye now G'day Lance K, Thanks for your question. thank u for washing me. That's barking mad. america so confusing. Helgawas the loyal lover-turned-spouse of Floki. What does Dog king mean? His name would in his own language (Proto-Norse) have been *Hailaga[2] (dedicated to the gods). Despite going through a lot because of Floki, including the death of their daughter, she still remained loyal and loving to him. ... "this is Gustav, he is our king and he is also the king of being a horse" next yuh tell me we have 50 states. They had a daughter, Angrboda. Halga, Helgi, Helghe or Helgo was a legendary Danish king living in the early 6th century. Scholars generally agree that he appears in both Anglo-Saxon (Beowulf) and Scandinavian tradition (Norse sagas and Danish chronicles)[3]. Valdar, sometimes assigned to the early 700s.