[2] He was inducted into both the Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum and the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. His half-brother Jim was a successful guitarist who worked with the Les Paul Trio in New York. "Country Gentleman". Atkins, Chet; Neely, Bill (1974). He recorded smooth jazz guitar still played on American airwaves today. Chet Atkins at the Country Music Hall of Fame, https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Chet_Atkins&oldid=985772740, Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License, 1972 Best Country Instrumental Performance – "Snowbird", 1975 Best Country Instrumental Performance, 1976 Best Country Instrumental Performance – "The Entertainer", 1977 Best Country Instrumental Performance, 1982 Best Country Instrumental Performance –, 1986 Best Country Instrumental Performance, 1991 Best Country Instrumental Performance, 1993 Best Country Instrumental Performance, 1994 Best Country Instrumental Performance, 1995 Best Country Instrumental Performance – "Young Thing", 1997 Best Country Instrumental Performance – "Jam Man", This page was last edited on 27 October 2020, at 21:30. That single, "Guitar Blues", was fairly progressive, including as it did, a clarinet solo by Nashville dance band musician Dutch McMillan with Owen Bradley on piano. He returned in the 1990s to play a series of charity concerts to save the school from demolition. [22] His award was presented by Marty Stuart and Brian Setzer and accepted by Atkins's grandson, Jonathan Russell. Burial will be in Greenwood Cemetery. In 2009, Steve Wariner released an album titled My Tribute to Chet Atkins. While he hadn't yet had a hit record on RCA his stature was growing. In 2011 Daughter Merle Atkins Russell bestowed the CGP degree upon long time sideman Paul Yandell. The group relocated to Nashville in mid-1950. This incarnation of the old Carter Family featured Maybelle Carter and daughters June, Helen, and Anita. [4], Chet profited off the popularity of his TV time by starting to record albums. When Sholes took over pop production in 1957—a result of his success with Elvis Presley—he put Atkins in charge of RCA Victor's Nashville division. Siman had been encouraging Steve Sholes to sign Atkins, as his style (with the success of Merle Travis as a hit recording artist) was suddenly in vogue. Atkins, Chet; Neely, Bill. He recorded extensively with close friend and fellow picker Jerry Reed, who'd become a hit artist in his own right. Tommy Emmanuel official website biography. [29] Similarly, he was a big influence on Doyle Dykes. At the end of the song, Black and Atkins had a brief conversation. [1] Whereas Travis's right hand used his index finger for the melody and thumb for bass notes, Atkins expanded his right-hand style to include picking with his first three fingers, with the thumb on bass. [4] By 1957, Chet was the head of recording operations at RCA Victor in Nashville. Instead, he would say something like, "we got a little tuning problem ... Everybody check and see what's going on." A stretch of Interstate 185 in southwest Georgia (between LaGrange and Columbus) is named "Chet Atkins Parkway". Atkins used the Jordanaires and a rhythm section on hits like Jim Reeves' "Four Walls" and "He'll Have to Go" and Don Gibson's "Oh Lonesome Me" and "Blue Blue Day". pp. Leona Atkins, the 85-year-old widow of Chet Atkins died Wednesday (Oct. 21) at her home in Nashville. His albums also became more popular. [8] He later purchased a semi-acoustic electric guitar and amp, but he had to travel many miles to find an electrical outlet, since his home didn't have electricity. Chet Atkins was an amateur radio general class licensee. [2] Although he played 'by ear' and was a masterful improviser he was able to read music and even performed some classical guitar pieces. He died on June 30, 2001, at his home in Nashville, Tennessee, at the age of 77. . The sound of the recordings improved significantly, and the studio achieved a string of successes. For the album by Charlie Byrd, see. [15], Jazz had always been a strong love of his, and often in his career he was criticized by "pure" country musicians for his jazz influences. A 1973 diagnosis of colon cancer, however, led Atkins to redefine his role at RCA, to allow others to handle administration while he went back to his first love, the guitar, often recording with Reed or even Homer & Jethro's Jethro Burns (Atkins's brother-in-law) after Homer died in 1971. Atkins spent most of his career at RCA Victor and produced records for the Browns, Hank Snow, Porter Wagoner, Norma Jean, Dolly Parton, Dottie West, Perry Como, Floyd Cramer, Elvis Presley, the Everly Brothers, Eddy Arnold, Don Gibson, Jim Reeves, Jerry Reed, Skeeter Davis, Waylon Jennings, Roger Whittaker, and many others. As a recording artist, Atkins grew disillusioned with RCA in the late 1970s. The group relocated to Nashville in the mid-1950s. He was featured on ABC-TV's The Eddy Arnold Show in the summer of 1956 and on Country Music Jubilee in 1957 and 1958 (by then renamed Jubilee USA). In 2011, his daughter Merle Atkins Russell bestowed the CGP degree on his longtime sideman Paul Yandell. [15] Atkins made his first appearance at the Opry in 1946 as a member of Foley's band. [4] Chet stated in his 1974 autobiography, "We were so poor and everybody around us was so poor that it was the forties before anyone even knew there had been a depression. Milwaukee: Hal Leonard. [4] He started playing local parties and businesses. ATKINS, Leona Johnson Age 85 of Nashville, TN, died on October 21, 2009. The sound of the recordings improved significantly, and the studio achieved a string of successes. The classical guitar selections included on almost all his albums were, for many American artists working in the field today, the first classical guitar they ever heard. Among many honors, Atkins received 14 Grammy Awards as well as the Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award, nine Country Music Association Instrumentalist of the Year awards, and was inducted into both the Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum and the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. In addition to recording, Atkins became a design consultant for Gretsch, who manufactured a popular Chet Atkins line of electric guitars from 1955–1980. Although he played by ear and was a masterful improviser, he was able to read music and even performed some classical guitar pieces. He was inducted into the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame, the Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum, and the Musicians Hall of Fame and Museum. Atkins produced records for Perry Como, Elvis Presley, the Everly Brothers, Eddy Arnold, Don Gibson, Jim Reeves, Jerry Reed, Skeeter Davis, Connie Smith, Waylon Jennings and others. His parents divorced when he was six. The following year, Atkins ranked number 28 in Country Music Television's "40 Greatest Men of Country Music". [5] [5][4][6][7][8] He had two brothers and a sister—he was the youngest. [Part 2]", "American Radio Relay League | Ham Radio Association and Resources", "Guitars Gently Weep as Nashville Pays Tribute to Chet Atkins", "Performing Arts Center, Buffalo State University". [18] The once-rare phenomenon of having a country hit cross over to pop success became more common. [15] In 1993, he was honored with the Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award. [4][12] This early influence dramatically shaped his unique playing style. Atkins made his own records, which usually visited pop standards and jazz, in a sophisticated home studio, often recording the rhythm tracks at RCA and adding his solo parts at home, refining the tracks until the results satisfied him.