In Greek mythology, Pallas (/ˈpæləs/; Greek: Πάλλας) was one of the Titans. He had two brothers, Astraeus and Perses, and he was married to Styx, with whom he had a number of children; Zelus, Nike, Kratos, Bia, Scylla, Fontes and Lacus. See Also: Crius, Eurybia, Titans, Astraeus, Perses, Styx, Athena. Maidens who die of their wounds are called false virgins. [5] Ovid uses the patronymic "Pallantias" or "Pallantis" as another name for Aurora, the Roman equivalent of the Greek Eos ("Dawn"), who was the sister of Selene; Ovid apparently regarding Aurora (or Eos) as the daughter of (or otherwise related to) Pallas. [1] Later, Athena took on the title Pallas as tribute to her late friend. His wife was Styx and he was the father of Nike, Bia, Cratos and Zelus. He had two brothers, Astraeus and Perses, and he was married to Styx, with whom he had a number of children; Zelus, Nike, Kratos, Bia, Scylla, Fontes and Lacus. "Next to these Machlyes are the Auseans; these and the Machlyes, separated by the Triton, live on the shores of the Tritonian lake. ", https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Pallas_(daughter_of_Triton)&oldid=905128116, Articles with unsourced statements from September 2018, Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License, This page was last edited on 7 July 2019, at 01:42. During an athletics festival, Pallas and Athena fought with spears in a friendly mock battle in which the victor would be whoever managed to disarm her opponent. Pallas (Titan), the son of Crius and Eurybia, brother of Astraeus and Perses, and husband of Styx. [2] Pallas was sometimes regarded as the Titan god of warcraft and of the springtime campaign season. In Greek mythology, Pallas (/ˈpæləs/; Ancient Greek: for male Πάλλας, gen. Πάλλαντος and for female Παλλάς, gen. Παλλάδος) may refer to the following figures: . Pallas, stunned in awe, stood still as Athena, expecting her to dodge, impaled Pallas, accidentally. In Greek mythology, Pallas (/ ˈ p æ l ə s /; Greek: Πάλλας) was one of the Titans.According to Hesiod, he was the son of Crius and Eurybia, the brother of Astraeus and Perses, the husband of Styx, and the father of Zelus ("Zeal" or "Emulation"), Nike ("Victory"), Kratos ("Strength" or "Power"), and Bia ("Might" or "Force"). Out of sadness and regret, she created the palladium, a statue in the likeness of Pallas, and wrapped the aegis, which she had feared, about the breast of it, and set it up beside Zeus and honored it. A passage by Herodotus recounts this custom:[2]. The Machlyes wear their hair long behind, the Auseans in front. [1] Hyginus says that Pallas, whom he calls "the giant", also fathered with Styx: Scylla, Fontes ("Fountains") and Lacus ("Lakes"). He was the son of Crius and Eurybia. During the Titanomachy, Pallas was killed by the goddess Athena. During the Titanomachy, Pallas was killed by the goddess Athena. The sea god taught both girls the arts of war. Pallas is a Titan god of the ancient Greek pantheon, born in the Golden Age of Greek mythology, before the rise of Zeus and the other Olympian deities. Pallas was the name of a Titan in Greek mythology. He fought on the side of the Titans in the Titanomachy and was cast, alongside his comrades, into Tartaros by the Olympians. [8], Online version at the Perseus Digital Library, Dictionary of Greek and Roman Biography and Mythology, https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Pallas_(Titan)&oldid=987104293, Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License, This page was last edited on 4 November 2020, at 23:09. Pallas was a Titan god in Greek mythology, son of the Titans Crius and Eurybia. After Athena was born fully armed from Zeus' forehead, Triton, acting as a foster parent to the goddess, raised her alongside his own daughter, Pallas. [citation needed], This story about Athena and Pallas inspired a yearly festival in Libya dedicated to the goddess. He was the Titan of warcraft. According to Hesiod, he was the son of Crius and Eurybia, the brother of Astraeus and Perses, the husband of Styx, and the father of Zelus ("Zeal" or "Emulation"), Nike ("Victory"), Kratos ("Strength" or "Power"), and Bia ("Might" or "Force"). Before the girls are set fighting, the whole people choose the fairest maid, and arm her with a Corinthian helmet and Greek panoply, to be then mounted on a chariot and drawn all along the lake shore. [3][4], The Homeric Hymn to Hermes makes the moon goddess Selene (usually the daughter of the Titans Hyperion and Theia), the daughter of a Pallas, son of (otherwise unknown) Megamedes, which is possibly the same as this Pallas. In Greek mythology, Pallas (/ˈpæləs/; Ancient Greek: Παλλάς) was the daughter of Triton, son of Poseidon and messenger of the seas. One Pallas, associated with Attica, attempts to conquer Athens with the support of his sons (the Pallantides), but is stopped by the hero Theseus. To confuse matters even more, there are also several other figures in Greek mythology who are called Pallas – and they’re all male. At the beginning of the fight, Athena got the upper hand, until Pallas took over. Pallas: GreekMythology.com - Nov 05, 2020, Greek Mythology iOS Volume Purchase Program VPP for Education App. Pallas (Giant), a son of Uranus and Gaia, killed and flayed by Athena. He was the Titan of warcraft. The sea god taught both girls the arts of war. The parents of Pallas were Crius and Eurybia. Sources for this story are often late (e.g. After Athena was born fully armed from Zeus' forehead, Triton, acting as a foster parent to the goddess, raised her alongside his own daughter, Pallas. Diodorus 4.60.4-5). He had two brothers, Astraeus and Perses, and he was married to Styx, with whom he had a number of children. With what armor they equipped their maidens before Greeks came to live near them, I cannot say; but I suppose the armor was Egyptian; for I maintain that the Greeks took their shield and helmet from Egypt. Pallas was a Titan god in Greek mythology, son of the Titans Crius and Eurybia.